bitch-youdontknowmylife:

theskaldspeaks:

needtherapy:

jnenifre:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. 

Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. 

Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. 

Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”

After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” 

As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”

In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. 

Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. 

To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/

To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/

For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281

To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229

And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math

Awesome, dude. Awesome. I mean, AWESOME.

WHAT AN EPIC BADASS!

legit

mymodernmet:

Iranian photographer Hossein Fatemi, offers a glimpse of an entirely different side to Iran than the image usually broadcasted by domestic and foreign media. In his photo series An Iranian Journey, many of the photographs reveal an Iran that most people never see, presenting an eye-opening look at the amazing diversity and contrasts that exist in the country.
mymodernmet:

Iranian photographer Hossein Fatemi, offers a glimpse of an entirely different side to Iran than the image usually broadcasted by domestic and foreign media. In his photo series An Iranian Journey, many of the photographs reveal an Iran that most people never see, presenting an eye-opening look at the amazing diversity and contrasts that exist in the country.
mymodernmet:

Iranian photographer Hossein Fatemi, offers a glimpse of an entirely different side to Iran than the image usually broadcasted by domestic and foreign media. In his photo series An Iranian Journey, many of the photographs reveal an Iran that most people never see, presenting an eye-opening look at the amazing diversity and contrasts that exist in the country.
mymodernmet:

Iranian photographer Hossein Fatemi, offers a glimpse of an entirely different side to Iran than the image usually broadcasted by domestic and foreign media. In his photo series An Iranian Journey, many of the photographs reveal an Iran that most people never see, presenting an eye-opening look at the amazing diversity and contrasts that exist in the country.
mymodernmet:

Iranian photographer Hossein Fatemi, offers a glimpse of an entirely different side to Iran than the image usually broadcasted by domestic and foreign media. In his photo series An Iranian Journey, many of the photographs reveal an Iran that most people never see, presenting an eye-opening look at the amazing diversity and contrasts that exist in the country.
mymodernmet:

Iranian photographer Hossein Fatemi, offers a glimpse of an entirely different side to Iran than the image usually broadcasted by domestic and foreign media. In his photo series An Iranian Journey, many of the photographs reveal an Iran that most people never see, presenting an eye-opening look at the amazing diversity and contrasts that exist in the country.
mymodernmet:

Iranian photographer Hossein Fatemi, offers a glimpse of an entirely different side to Iran than the image usually broadcasted by domestic and foreign media. In his photo series An Iranian Journey, many of the photographs reveal an Iran that most people never see, presenting an eye-opening look at the amazing diversity and contrasts that exist in the country.
mymodernmet:

Iranian photographer Hossein Fatemi, offers a glimpse of an entirely different side to Iran than the image usually broadcasted by domestic and foreign media. In his photo series An Iranian Journey, many of the photographs reveal an Iran that most people never see, presenting an eye-opening look at the amazing diversity and contrasts that exist in the country.
mymodernmet:

Iranian photographer Hossein Fatemi, offers a glimpse of an entirely different side to Iran than the image usually broadcasted by domestic and foreign media. In his photo series An Iranian Journey, many of the photographs reveal an Iran that most people never see, presenting an eye-opening look at the amazing diversity and contrasts that exist in the country.
mymodernmet:

Iranian photographer Hossein Fatemi, offers a glimpse of an entirely different side to Iran than the image usually broadcasted by domestic and foreign media. In his photo series An Iranian Journey, many of the photographs reveal an Iran that most people never see, presenting an eye-opening look at the amazing diversity and contrasts that exist in the country.

mymodernmet:

Iranian photographer Hossein Fatemi, offers a glimpse of an entirely different side to Iran than the image usually broadcasted by domestic and foreign media. In his photo series An Iranian Journey, many of the photographs reveal an Iran that most people never see, presenting an eye-opening look at the amazing diversity and contrasts that exist in the country.

unhistorical:

April 4, 1968: Martin Luther King, Jr. is assassinated.

The night before his assassination, King delivered his last speech at Mason Temple in Memphis, Tennessee; popularly known as “I’ve Been to the Mountain”, this speech was made in support of the Memphis Sanitation Workers Strike and called upon the United States to ”be true to what you said on paper”. 

At around 6 PM, King was standing on the balcony outside his room at Memphis’  Lorraine Motel when he was struck by a single bullet through the cheek, fired from a pump-action rifle wielded by James Earl Ray, who shortly afterward fled north to Canada. After being taken to the hospital, King was pronounced dead five minutes after 7. All across the United States, violent riots in Baltimore, Chicago, Washington, D.C., and elsewhere broke out during the week following the assassination, though notably not in Indianapolis, where Robert F. Kennedy, who would be assassinated two months later, delivered arguably his speech informing the city’s residents of King’s death.

The funeral, which took place on April 9, was attended by 300,000 people, and a bill to establish a holiday in his honor was presented in Congress not long after. King’s family, and many others besides, maintain that James Earl Ray (a small-time criminal) was the scapegoat of a conspiracy involving the U.S. government and FBI. It is fact that the FBI’s COINTELPRO closely monitored King’s (and other “subversives’) activities intensely often through illegal or dubious means, such as wiretapping and break-ins. The agency also sent King an anonymous letter urging him to commit suicide. In 1999, King’s family won a civil suit in Memphis in which jurors reached the unanimous verdict that “Loyd Jowers [a restaurant owner in 1968] as well as ”others, including governmental agencies’” had been part of a conspiracy to murder King. 

Partial transcript from the 1999 case

Bottom five photographs from LIFE

awkwardsituationist:

french photographer eric valli has spent over twenty years documenting the peoples of the himalayas, including the dolpo, seen here, who live between tibet and nepal in one of the highest inhabitable regions in the world.
"they work hard, but want for nothing," he says. "they are happy and alive."
eschewing digital cameras, valli continues to shoot with his leicas. “i might take an okay picture, but what i’m looking for is an enthnogrpahic testimony of the human adventure; a complete existence in one picture,” he says.
 “you can never just observe. because my work is all about interaction. …i have lived years and years with these people. i have nothing to teach them and they have everything to teach me.”
awkwardsituationist:

french photographer eric valli has spent over twenty years documenting the peoples of the himalayas, including the dolpo, seen here, who live between tibet and nepal in one of the highest inhabitable regions in the world.
"they work hard, but want for nothing," he says. "they are happy and alive."
eschewing digital cameras, valli continues to shoot with his leicas. “i might take an okay picture, but what i’m looking for is an enthnogrpahic testimony of the human adventure; a complete existence in one picture,” he says.
 “you can never just observe. because my work is all about interaction. …i have lived years and years with these people. i have nothing to teach them and they have everything to teach me.”
awkwardsituationist:

french photographer eric valli has spent over twenty years documenting the peoples of the himalayas, including the dolpo, seen here, who live between tibet and nepal in one of the highest inhabitable regions in the world.
"they work hard, but want for nothing," he says. "they are happy and alive."
eschewing digital cameras, valli continues to shoot with his leicas. “i might take an okay picture, but what i’m looking for is an enthnogrpahic testimony of the human adventure; a complete existence in one picture,” he says.
 “you can never just observe. because my work is all about interaction. …i have lived years and years with these people. i have nothing to teach them and they have everything to teach me.”
awkwardsituationist:

french photographer eric valli has spent over twenty years documenting the peoples of the himalayas, including the dolpo, seen here, who live between tibet and nepal in one of the highest inhabitable regions in the world.
"they work hard, but want for nothing," he says. "they are happy and alive."
eschewing digital cameras, valli continues to shoot with his leicas. “i might take an okay picture, but what i’m looking for is an enthnogrpahic testimony of the human adventure; a complete existence in one picture,” he says.
 “you can never just observe. because my work is all about interaction. …i have lived years and years with these people. i have nothing to teach them and they have everything to teach me.”
awkwardsituationist:

french photographer eric valli has spent over twenty years documenting the peoples of the himalayas, including the dolpo, seen here, who live between tibet and nepal in one of the highest inhabitable regions in the world.
"they work hard, but want for nothing," he says. "they are happy and alive."
eschewing digital cameras, valli continues to shoot with his leicas. “i might take an okay picture, but what i’m looking for is an enthnogrpahic testimony of the human adventure; a complete existence in one picture,” he says.
 “you can never just observe. because my work is all about interaction. …i have lived years and years with these people. i have nothing to teach them and they have everything to teach me.”
awkwardsituationist:

french photographer eric valli has spent over twenty years documenting the peoples of the himalayas, including the dolpo, seen here, who live between tibet and nepal in one of the highest inhabitable regions in the world.
"they work hard, but want for nothing," he says. "they are happy and alive."
eschewing digital cameras, valli continues to shoot with his leicas. “i might take an okay picture, but what i’m looking for is an enthnogrpahic testimony of the human adventure; a complete existence in one picture,” he says.
 “you can never just observe. because my work is all about interaction. …i have lived years and years with these people. i have nothing to teach them and they have everything to teach me.”
awkwardsituationist:

french photographer eric valli has spent over twenty years documenting the peoples of the himalayas, including the dolpo, seen here, who live between tibet and nepal in one of the highest inhabitable regions in the world.
"they work hard, but want for nothing," he says. "they are happy and alive."
eschewing digital cameras, valli continues to shoot with his leicas. “i might take an okay picture, but what i’m looking for is an enthnogrpahic testimony of the human adventure; a complete existence in one picture,” he says.
 “you can never just observe. because my work is all about interaction. …i have lived years and years with these people. i have nothing to teach them and they have everything to teach me.”
awkwardsituationist:

french photographer eric valli has spent over twenty years documenting the peoples of the himalayas, including the dolpo, seen here, who live between tibet and nepal in one of the highest inhabitable regions in the world.
"they work hard, but want for nothing," he says. "they are happy and alive."
eschewing digital cameras, valli continues to shoot with his leicas. “i might take an okay picture, but what i’m looking for is an enthnogrpahic testimony of the human adventure; a complete existence in one picture,” he says.
 “you can never just observe. because my work is all about interaction. …i have lived years and years with these people. i have nothing to teach them and they have everything to teach me.”
awkwardsituationist:

french photographer eric valli has spent over twenty years documenting the peoples of the himalayas, including the dolpo, seen here, who live between tibet and nepal in one of the highest inhabitable regions in the world.
"they work hard, but want for nothing," he says. "they are happy and alive."
eschewing digital cameras, valli continues to shoot with his leicas. “i might take an okay picture, but what i’m looking for is an enthnogrpahic testimony of the human adventure; a complete existence in one picture,” he says.
 “you can never just observe. because my work is all about interaction. …i have lived years and years with these people. i have nothing to teach them and they have everything to teach me.”

awkwardsituationist:

french photographer eric valli has spent over twenty years documenting the peoples of the himalayas, including the dolpo, seen here, who live between tibet and nepal in one of the highest inhabitable regions in the world.

"they work hard, but want for nothing," he says. "they are happy and alive."

eschewing digital cameras, valli continues to shoot with his leicas. “i might take an okay picture, but what i’m looking for is an enthnogrpahic testimony of the human adventure; a complete existence in one picture,” he says.

“you can never just observe. because my work is all about interaction. …i have lived years and years with these people. i have nothing to teach them and they have everything to teach me.”

(Source: mutiler)

thebiobabe:

iraffiruse:

Frozach Submitted

this is like a pop culture version of Cosmos cosmic calendar smashed together with the real one thebiobabe:

iraffiruse:

Frozach Submitted

this is like a pop culture version of Cosmos cosmic calendar smashed together with the real one thebiobabe:

iraffiruse:

Frozach Submitted

this is like a pop culture version of Cosmos cosmic calendar smashed together with the real one thebiobabe:

iraffiruse:

Frozach Submitted

this is like a pop culture version of Cosmos cosmic calendar smashed together with the real one thebiobabe:

iraffiruse:

Frozach Submitted

this is like a pop culture version of Cosmos cosmic calendar smashed together with the real one thebiobabe:

iraffiruse:

Frozach Submitted

this is like a pop culture version of Cosmos cosmic calendar smashed together with the real one thebiobabe:

iraffiruse:

Frozach Submitted

this is like a pop culture version of Cosmos cosmic calendar smashed together with the real one thebiobabe:

iraffiruse:

Frozach Submitted

this is like a pop culture version of Cosmos cosmic calendar smashed together with the real one thebiobabe:

iraffiruse:

Frozach Submitted

this is like a pop culture version of Cosmos cosmic calendar smashed together with the real one thebiobabe:

iraffiruse:

Frozach Submitted

this is like a pop culture version of Cosmos cosmic calendar smashed together with the real one

thebiobabe:

iraffiruse:

Frozach Submitted

this is like a pop culture version of Cosmos cosmic calendar smashed together with the real one

unlovde:

tardis-are-y0u-drunk-again:

fairytalefaker:

Do you know the horrors that happened where you’re standing?

Life goes on, strange isn’t it?

goosebumps
unlovde:

tardis-are-y0u-drunk-again:

fairytalefaker:

Do you know the horrors that happened where you’re standing?

Life goes on, strange isn’t it?

goosebumps
unlovde:

tardis-are-y0u-drunk-again:

fairytalefaker:

Do you know the horrors that happened where you’re standing?

Life goes on, strange isn’t it?

goosebumps
unlovde:

tardis-are-y0u-drunk-again:

fairytalefaker:

Do you know the horrors that happened where you’re standing?

Life goes on, strange isn’t it?

goosebumps
unlovde:

tardis-are-y0u-drunk-again:

fairytalefaker:

Do you know the horrors that happened where you’re standing?

Life goes on, strange isn’t it?

goosebumps
unlovde:

tardis-are-y0u-drunk-again:

fairytalefaker:

Do you know the horrors that happened where you’re standing?

Life goes on, strange isn’t it?

goosebumps
unlovde:

tardis-are-y0u-drunk-again:

fairytalefaker:

Do you know the horrors that happened where you’re standing?

Life goes on, strange isn’t it?

goosebumps
unlovde:

tardis-are-y0u-drunk-again:

fairytalefaker:

Do you know the horrors that happened where you’re standing?

Life goes on, strange isn’t it?

goosebumps
unlovde:

tardis-are-y0u-drunk-again:

fairytalefaker:

Do you know the horrors that happened where you’re standing?

Life goes on, strange isn’t it?

goosebumps
unlovde:

tardis-are-y0u-drunk-again:

fairytalefaker:

Do you know the horrors that happened where you’re standing?

Life goes on, strange isn’t it?

goosebumps

unlovde:

tardis-are-y0u-drunk-again:

fairytalefaker:

Do you know the horrors that happened where you’re standing?

Life goes on, strange isn’t it?

goosebumps

"Women are afraid of meeting a serial killer. Men are afraid of meeting someone fat."
When Strangers Click, a 2011 documentary about online dating (via rawfuel)

(Source: tealeafprincess)

bag-of-dirt:

U.S. Pfc. Rocco Festa of Brooklyn, New York, Military Police Platoon of the 2nd Infantry Division, tries to learn a few French phrases from a military issued French dictionary aboard the Liberty ship SS John Hay. Elements of the division had already landed on Omaha Beach on 6 June. Off the coast of Omaha Beach, near Sainte-Honorine-des-Pertes and Vierville-sur-Mer, Calvados, Lower Normandy, France. 15 June 1944.